A straight forward experiment as to whether supplmentation with minerals bound to glycine can lead to difficulties

There are four human molybdenum containing enzymes, sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase, aldehyde oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime reductase. Sulfite oxidase is expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and is highy expressed in the liver. Xanthine oxidoreductase is expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Aldehyde oxidase is highly expressed in the liver.

Sodium molybdate supplmentation in rats increases levels of molybdenum containing proteins in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. 2000 micrograms of molybdenum a day is the Tolerable Upper Intake Level for molybdenum set for humans by the Institute of Medicine which did not study molybdenum glycinate. Giving rats by gavage the rat equivalent of 2000 micrograms a day of molybdenum from molybdenum glycinate in three divided dosages and then comparing levels of sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase and aldehyde oxidase in intestines and livers of rats to levels of sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase, aldehyde oxidase in intestines and livers of rats given by gavage the rat equivalent of 2000 micrograms a day of molybdenum from sodium molybdate would test the effect of molybdenum glycinate on molybdenum-containing gastrointestestinal enzymes and on molybdenum-containing liver enzymes. Molybdenum would be given in three divided dosages so molybdenum bound to glycine would always be in the gastrotintestinal tract and liver. Two divided dosages of molybdenum in humans would not be unusual. With molybdenun-containing enzymes there are only a few enzymes to look at simplyfing the experiment.

The prediction is that rats given molydenum glycinate will have lower levels of molybdenum-containing gastrointestestinal enzymes and lower levels of molybdenum-containing liver enzymes than rats given sodium molybdate.

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