A proposed experiment on the effects of vitamin C and iron on the gut epigenome

One group of guinea pigs would be given vitamin C by gavage two times a day, another group of guinea pigs would be given vitamin C and slow release iron sulfate by gavage two times a day with the vitamin C and slow release iron given at the same time and a third group of guinea pigs would be given vitamin C two times a day and and slow release iron once a day with the slow release iron given away from the vitamin C and as the last supplement given each day. . Slow release iron is used where the slow release iron is given last in the day to insure that iron is available or at least has a chance to be available in the gut. A fourth group of guinea pigs would be a control group. Rats synthesize vitamin C, however, guinea pigs do not not so guinea pigs rather than rats are used in the experiment

In six months time the gut epigenomes of the guinea pigs could be investigated. I think there would be large differences in the gut epigenomes of the various groups of guinea pigs. The guinea pigs given vitamin C and iron together and vitamin C alone would show high levels of DNA methylation in the gut as with vitamin C iron is well absorbed and not available in the gut. TET enzymes and JmjC domain-containing proteins require both vitamin C and iron. The guinea pigs given vitamin C and slow release iron at different times would show low levels of DNA methylation in the gut as then both iron and vitamin C would be available in the gut for TET enzymes and JmjC domain-containing proteins

Vitamin C is being investigated as a way to reprogram the gut epigenome in terms of treating cancer. A test of the effects of vitamin C and vitamin C and iron on the gut epigenome could be a preliminary experiment in terms of eventually reprogramming the epigenome in terms of treating cancer with vitamin C. Augmentation of intracellular iron using iron sucrose enhances the toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate in colon cancer cells. This could be due to increased DNA demethylation of colon cancer cells.

Looking into vitamin C one more time

Linus Pauling brought vitamin C to the world’s attention

Vitamin C has been repeatedly investigated since Linus Pauling focused on vitamin C. TET enzymes and JmjC domain-containing proteins are vitamin C and iron dependent enzymes which demethylate DNA and histones respectively. .Vitamin C is being investigated as a way to reprogram the epigenome..

There are various difficulties with supplementation with vitamin C. First of all vitamin C is poorly absorbed. Secondly vitamin C can affect mineral absorption. The adverse affects on mineral absorption of vitamin C has not been sufficiently stressed as an important limiting factor in vitamin C supplementation. As iron must be available in the gut forming vitamin C-iron complexes in the gut may not be desirable.

Getting vitamin C to work could be as easy as not taking trace minerals such as iron and copper at the same time as vitamin C. What one would be looking for is whether activity of TET enzymes and JmjC domain-containing proteins could be be increased by supplemental vitamin C and carbonyl iron taken at different times of the day. Activity of TET enzymes and JmjC domain-containing proteins in the gut would be investigated. A combination of immediate release vitamin C and liposomal vitamin C where the vitamin C is taken away from trace minerals could be optimal.