Coenzyme Q10 is associated with decreased mortality. Why?

Still reduced cardiovascular mortality 12 years after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years: A validation of previous 10-year follow-up results of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in elderly.

Alehagen U, Aaseth J, Alexander J, Johansson P.

The following quote is from the paper.

“Conclusion: This is a 12-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants that were supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years. Even after twelve years we observed a significantly reduced risk for CV mortality in this group, as well as in subgroups of patients with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or impaired functional capacity. The results thus validate the results obtained in the 10-year evaluation. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but persisted during the follow-up period. The mechanisms behind this effect remain to be fully elucidated, although various effects on cardiac function, oxidative stress, fibrosis and inflammation have previously been identified. Since this was a small study, the observations should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.”

Coenzyme Q10 is a co-factor for succinate dehydrogenase. Succinate dehydrogenase metabolizes succinate in the TCA cycle. Succinate inhibits 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone and DNA demethylase enzymes. By way of being a co-factor for succinate dehydrogenase coenzyme Q10 could reduce inappropriate DNA and histone methlylation decreasing mortality. Ubiquinol should not be helpful in terms of decreasing mortality.

Iron positively regulates other enzymes in the citric acid cycle besides aconitase

Besides aconitase iron positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, the enzymes being citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase synthase and and succinate dehydrogenase.

Iron-dependent changes in cellular energy metabolism: influence on citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation

Horst Oexle, Erich Gnaiger and Gunter Weiss Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Bioenergetics

Abstract

Iron modulates the expression of the critical citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase via a translational mechanism involving iron regulatory proteins. Thus, the present study was undertaken to investigate the consequences of iron perturbation on citric acid cycle activity, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration in the human cell line K-562. In agreement with previous data iron increases the activity of mitochondrial aconitase while it is reduced upon addition of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). Interestingly, iron also positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, namely citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase, while DFO decreases the activity of these enzymes. Consequently, iron supplementation results in increased formation of reducing equivalents (NADH) by the citric acid cycle, and thus in increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP formation via oxidative phosphorylation as shown herein. This in turn leads to downregulation of glucose utilization. In contrast, all these metabolic pathways are reduced upon iron depletion, and thus glycolysis and lactate formation are significantly increased in order to compensate for the decrease in ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of DFO. Our results point to a complex interaction between iron homeostasis, oxygen supply and cellular energy metabolism in human cells.